A real Longmont crisis vs. an imagined one

A real Longmont crisis vs. an imagined one

By Dave Larison

It occurs to me in the midst of the current public health crisis that Longmont actually has two declared emergencies in effect, one a very real threat due to COVID-19 and the other a fictitious “climate emergency” forced by local environmentalists in the fall of 2019.

Last January at a Longmont City Council meeting, I incredulously heard a deputy city manager state, “This is a crisis (climate change) not unlike the crisis and emergency that we went through in the 2013 flood.” Oh please. If anything, there will be a great backlash against the radical environmental movement in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Continue reading

Home Rule does not equal Mob Rule

The loud cry of the progressive left on the international scale right down to Longmont is democracy…democracy…democracy!

rabblerabble

This may sound admirable, but there is one important caveat: Democracy only works under the Rule of Law. Otherwise, mob rule results (see Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt). The Founders knew this well in crafting the U.S. Constitution. 

Continue reading

Coombs invisible when it counts

Great leaders as mayors are highly visible in times of crisis. The classic example was that of Rudy Giuliani with the 9/11 attacks. He served to calm and reassure New York City as well as the entire nation.

By comparison, Longmont mayor Dennis Coombs was not at all visible to the public for 2 1/2 days after the September flood. When he did appear via media, it was a hastily produced web video of little value.

I have no doubt that Dennis Coombs is a terrific restaurant owner, but he is a fish out of water serving in public office as mayor. Challenger Bryan Baum has always carried the presence and wisdom of a mayoral leader and is best suited to lead Longmont both in good times and in times of crisis.

The unsurprising failure of Denver’s ‘affordable housing’ ordinance

Randal O’Toole of the Independence Institute confirms what we’ve known all along–that forced affordable housing programs don’t work and amount to government engineering of local real estate markets.

Fortunately, Longmont City Council under Mayor Bryan Baum repealed its Inclusionary Zoning ordinance in 2011.  But in true far-left fashion, the city of Boulder continues its affordable housing program at an outlandish 20% mandate to builders.

The unsurprising failure of Denver’s ‘affordable housing’ ordinance

The unsurprising failure of Denver’s ‘affordable housing’ ordinance

By Randal O’Toole

Denver’s urban-growth boundary has made housing expensive. More than a decade ago, the city blamed “failure by the private market to produce enough affordable housing” (see p. 5). To fix this “failure,” the city required developers to build “affordable housing.” Now, the city admits that this ordinance is a failure. Continue reading

Carroll: In Colorado, anti-fracking activists still don’t rule

OPINION

By Vincent Carroll

The Denver Post
June 23, 2013

Anti-fracking activists protest outside the Boulder County Courthouse on June 18. (Jeremy Papasso, Daily Camera)

 

Boulder County this week became the latest jurisdiction in Colorado to defy state law in a bid to placate anti-fracking activists — or fractivists, as they are sometimes called — by extending a moratorium on applications for oil and gas development.

So the county’s original moratorium, now extended several times, has effectively become a drilling ban. And yet the state high court has ruled in the past that a city can’t outlaw drilling — an opinion the court is likely to stand by should it rule again. Continue reading