Want it quick? Follow on Twitter

Sometimes life moves too fast for blogs or blogging.  Want to find out what’s going on quicker?  Follow @clightningrod on Twitter.  Facebook’s okay, and we have a page there, but Twitter is quick and to the point.  If you can’t get your point across in 160 characters, or at least the relevant highlights, well, go read a book or the newspaper.  Here’s a typical tweet:

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Coombs invisible when it counts

Great leaders as mayors are highly visible in times of crisis. The classic example was that of Rudy Giuliani with the 9/11 attacks. He served to calm and reassure New York City as well as the entire nation.

By comparison, Longmont mayor Dennis Coombs was not at all visible to the public for 2 1/2 days after the September flood. When he did appear via media, it was a hastily produced web video of little value.

I have no doubt that Dennis Coombs is a terrific restaurant owner, but he is a fish out of water serving in public office as mayor. Challenger Bryan Baum has always carried the presence and wisdom of a mayoral leader and is best suited to lead Longmont both in good times and in times of crisis.

Moving target

I always get a chuckle when one of the lefty screwballs in the area point out that I used to run this or that website, as if I’m ashamed of it.  (Hint: I’m not).  I even point out over there in the upper right-hand corner all of the former sites I’ve run throughout the years.  I’m glad to see the entries from those sites still get traffic.

Some may assume I had to change site names for one reason or another, that I had to dupe readers into thinking they were reading some new site from some new guy.  Of course the flaw in that logic is I sign my real name to all of the entries on those sites.  I changed site names over the years partly out of boredom, short attention span, strategy, whatever. Continue reading

Where’s Waldo?

Ya know, was going to avoid the political ramifications of the Longmont Flood of 2013, but here goes anyway:

This is probably a once in a lifetime event for most, and a historic, while tragic, event for Longmont to be sure. Many people are suffering, many more are unsure of what’s going on and how bad things are – or aren’t. We are a city of nearly 90,000 people and are in the news all over the world because of the little creek that could (St. Vrain River), and did. Continue reading