The Longmont Years: 2009-2011 Breaking the Bloc

In this installment, we pick up in early 2009 after apparent local political burnout – or so I thought.  The previous two years were hectic, to say the least.  Output increased in quantity and quality, both in the written and spoken word.  By the end of ’08 I had gone back to one of my first loves: aviation.  But staying away from local politics was apparently not in the cards. Continue reading

Home stretch of Longmont 2011 Election: Turnout and projections

Predicting voter turnout is never an easy task, especially in off (or odd) year elections like this years.  Predicting actual winners is equally difficult as it all boils down to who gets out the vote and who doesn’t.  I’ll try to make a stab at these with educated guesses based on past history and trends. Continue reading

Home stretch of Longmont 2011 Election: The money game

With just a couple of days left to get votes in, there are some races that can already be called.  Of course, I’m talking about the money race, as of the 3rd Reporting Period for candidates.  People can argue about the importance, or lack thereof, of contributions, but the candidates who raised and spent the most in 2009 won. Continue reading

End partisanship with this election

(A version of this article ran in the Saturday 10/29/11 Times-Call)
I get asked all the time why do I get involved in local politics?  The answer is twofold.  First, local ordinances and regulations have a far greater effect on your everyday life than some behemoth bureaucracy at the federal level.  And secondly, it’s easier for a citizen to become knowledgeable of and affect those local policies – in other words, “take on city hall”. Continue reading

“Goldilocks” Levison “just wrong” for Longmont

If you are a subscriber to the Times-Call you saw a fairly self-centered and egotistical editorial by Longmont City Councilmember Sarah Levison.  This is par for her course as she’s often referred to herself as the “hardest working member of council.”  Talking endlessly does not equate working hard, it just equates…talking a lot.  But the “Goldilocks” reference she used is apt, but not in the way she means. Continue reading

Longmont’s Democratic candidates and committees hiding contributors

There’s something rotten in Denmark, or Longmont more specifically.  There is a game afoot to get around reporting who is making campaign contributions and how much they are contributing.  The most egregious example of this has been made by someone on council who pushed the hardest for transparency in campaign reports:  Councilmember Sarah Levison.  But not far behind is a slew of fellow Democrat candidates and a committee. Continue reading

Councilmember Hansen lies about how he chooses board appointments

At a candidate forum organized by the St. Vrain Valley Latino Coalition on October 20th, the topic of board appointments came up. In a Times Call article, Scott Rochat wrote that “according to the 2010 census, about 25 percent of Longmont’s population is Hispanic. But few of those Hispanics serve on the city’s boards and committees.” 

Ward 1 Councilman Brian Hansen replied to that issue and said that whenever other qualifications were equal, he always voted for a minority appointment.”

That is not true Councilmember Hansen. Continue reading

Yellow Scene makes some surprise endorsements

I occasionally check out the Yellow Scene magazine.  They’ve been somewhat fair to me over the years, and even gave me one of the first write-ups of my first blog, Wrongmont, and it was positive.  I think it’s pretty universally accepted to say they lean to the left politically, so to say some of its recent endorsements for Longmont City Council was a surprise is putting it lightly. Continue reading

Continue the liberal/progressive losing streak

Longmont voters would do well to follow regional and national trends and remove the liberal/progressive cancer that has infested our local government.  The elections of 2006-2008, especially Longmont’s election of ’07, have proven to be an aberration that has left a foul taste in most citizens’ mouths, and voters have been turning back this unseemly tide. Continue reading